Browsing: Alimentazione

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Published on: Tue, 16 Jul 2019

According to Article 12 of Regulation (EC) No 396/2005, EFSA has reviewed the maximum residue levels (MRLs) currently established at European level for the pesticide active substance fluopicolide. To assess the occurrence of fluopicolide residues in plants, processed commodities, rotational crops and livestock, EFSA considered the conclusions derived in the framework of Directive 91/414/EEC, the MRLs established by the Codex Alimentarius Commission as well as the import tolerances and European authorisations reported by Member States (including the supporting residues data). Based on the assessment of the available data, MRL proposals were derived and a consumer risk assessment was carried out. Some information required by the regulatory framework was missing and a possible acute risk to consumers was identified. Hence, the consumer risk assessment is considered indicative only, some MRL proposals derived by EFSA still require further consideration by risk managers and measures for reduction of the consumer exposure should also be considered.

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Published on: Tue, 16 Jul 2019

Data were collected for (i) consumption of non‐prepackaged ready‐to‐eat (RTE) cooked meat products, (ii) types of RTE cooked meat products available on the Greek market including analyses of water activity, pH, concentration of nitrite (NaNO2) and lactic acid bacteria, (iii) consumer practices after purchase of the meat products (e.g., transport time, handling, storage), (iv) temperature profiles in household refrigerators and (v) L. monocytogenes prevalence of the slicing machine and sliced RTE product. The Food Safety and Spoilage Predictor model was validated against observed L. monocytogenesgrowth in non‐prepackaged RTE cooked meat products at different static and dynamic temperature conditions simulating domestic stage. The data and validated model were used to develop a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) model predicting the listeriosis risk related to the consumption of these meat products handled at retail stores in Greece. The probability of illness per serving was found highly related to the NaNO2concentration; products having a lower concentration showed a higher risk per serving. A sensitivity analysis showed that the prevalence and initial concentration of L. monocytogenes immediately after slicing as well as the temperature and duration of storage in the domestic refrigerator had the highest impact on the probability of illness per serving. A median number of seven listeriosis cases per year was predicted for the total population upon consumption of these products handled at retail food service environments in Greece. The predicted 95th percentiles of the listeriosis cases totaled 33 of which 13 cases were <65 years old and 20 cases ≥65 years old. The higher number of cases was predicted for mortadella, smoked turkey, boiled turkey and parizer, which were the most frequently consumed categories. Two scenarios for assessing potential interventions to reduce the risk were tested: setting a use‐by date of 14 days in these products and improving the temperature of domestic storage. Both scenarios resulted in the elimination of the median number of annual cases and decreased significantly the 95th and 99th percentiles.

Alimentazione
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Published on: Mon, 15 Jul 2019

The Framework Working Contract (FWC) number OC/EFSA/ALPHA/2018/01 between the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), the contracting authority, and the SIGMA consortium, the contractor, is in force from 23 May 2018 until 22 May 2021. The subject matter of the FWC is the provision of technical support to improve and automatize the collection and reporting to EFSA by the European Union (EU) Member States of data on animal disease outbreaks and surveillance (SIGMA). The contracting authority orders services by sending the contractor Order Forms, which include the technical specifications for the elaboration of the deliverables. In the context of the FWC, the Order Form number 2 (OF2) was signed on the 3rd of August 2018.

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Published on: Mon, 15 Jul 2019

The qualified presumption of safety (QPS) procedure was developed to provide a harmonised generic pre‐evaluation to support safety risk assessments of biological agents performed by EFSA’s Scientific Panels. The taxonomic identity, body of knowledge, safety concerns and antimicrobial resistance were assessed. Safety concerns identified for a taxonomic unit (TU) are, where possible and reasonable in number, reflected by ‘qualifications’ which should be assessed at the strain level by the EFSA’s Scientific Panels. During the current assessment, no new information was found that would change the previously recommended QPS TUs and their qualifications. The list of microorganisms notified to EFSA from applications for market authorisation was updated with 47 biological agents, received between October 2018 and March 2019. Of these, 19 already had QPS status, 20 were excluded from the QPS exercise by the previous QPS mandate (11 filamentous fungi) or from further evaluations within the current mandate (9 notifications of Escherichia coli). Sphingomonas elodea, Gluconobacter frateurii, Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, Corynebacterium casei, Burkholderia ubonensis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Microbacterium foliorum and Euglena gracilis were evaluated for the first time. Sphingomonas elodea cannot be assessed for a possible QPS recommendation because it is not a valid species. Corynebacterium ammoniagenes and Euglena gracilis can be recommended for the QPS list with the qualification ‘for production purposes only’. The following TUs cannot be recommended for the QPS list: Burkholderia ubonensis, due to its potential and confirmed ability to generate biologically active compounds and limited of body of knowledge; Corynebacterium casei, Gluconobacter frateurii and Microbacterium foliorum, due to lack of body of knowledge; Phaeodactylum tricornutum, based on the lack of a safe history of use in the food chain and limited knowledge on its potential production of bioactive compounds with possible toxic effects.

Alimentazione
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Published on: Mon, 15 Jul 2019

The European Commission requested scientific technical assistance for the analysis of a European Union coordinated monitoring programme on the prevalence of norovirus in raw oysters. A total of 2,180 valid samples were taken from production areas and 2,129 from dispatch centres, taken over two consecutive years, ensuring the precision and the confidence desired in the estimation. The prevalence at production areas was estimated to be 34.5% (CI: 30.1–39.1%), while for batches from dispatch centres it was 10.8% (CI: 8.2–14.4%). The analyses show a strong seasonal effect, with higher contamination in the period November to April, as well as lower contamination for Class A areas than other classes. These associations were observed in both production areas and batches from dispatch centres. The results for both genogroups were above the respective limit of quantification (LOQ) in less than 10% of the samples taken. The simple substitution of not‐detected and positive samples below the LOQ, by half of the limit of detection and half of the LOQ, respectively, produced estimates of the proportion of samples above or equal to 300 copies per gram (cpg) comparable to the statistical model. The current bacteriological microbiological criteria applicable to live bivalve molluscs might be complemented by a norovirus criterion. The analyses of the substitution approach show that selection of a potential limit within a microbiological criterion close to or lower than the LOQ (for example, less than 300 cpg, given the current test used in this survey) would be difficult to apply. This survey only assessed thresholds from the perspective of the analytical capability and not that of human health risk.

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